N for Nipponophile #AtoZChallenge

Nipponophile

Meaning: One who loves Japan or Japanese culture.

Etymology: from Romanized version of the native Japanese name for Japan + phile (lover of)

Pronunciation: Nipp-own-a-phile

Usage in a sentence: “She returned back to India, a Nipponophile.”

nipponophile

Here are some things about Japan that will turn you into a Nipponophile/Japanophile

  • They’re so considerate about other people that they wear surgical masks if they catch a cold, to avoid passing it to someone else! Compare that with our Indian mentality of spitting bacteria-laden globs of yuck on every road and corner.
  • Most restaurants ask you to remove your shoes before you enter the lobby. Wearing socks is fine.
  • They do not speak in loud tones while they converse in public places. That’s a far cry from the excited chatter of travelers in the second class compartment of trains in Mumbai.
  • They do not accept credit cards. Only cash transactions. So if you’re someone like me, who keeps forgetting important numbers like passwords and PIN codes, or is generally paranoid of using credit cards for an unreasonable fear, go to Japan with a wad of Yens in your pocket.
  • You need to be well-mannered in Japan. If you are someone who wants people to thank you for every little thing that you do, you would be extremely happy in Japan.
  • If you get irritated when people leave half-eaten meals on the table and walk out of the restaurant, you’d be impressed by the Japanese. They slurp up every noodle from the bowl. They consider leaving half-eaten dishes as disrespect to the farmer who harvested the rice so painstakingly.
Flower Garden, Hokkaido, Japan
Flower Garden, Hokkaido, Japan
  • Unesco recently added Japanese cuisine – known in Japan as washoku – to its Intangible Cultural Heritage list. This puts it equal to French cuisine, the only other national culinary tradition to be so honoured.
  • The cuisine out there has the world’s variety. Meat, fish, rice, wheat, vegetables.   You’ll find everything you’ve always wanted to eat, including the weirdest and whackiest ingredients. Blowfish, sushi, grilled eel, barbecued lamb, vegetarian buffets at 400-year old restaurants.  Eat it all here.
  • Also, waiters leave you alone as you enjoy the sensuous experience of dining out.   They do not interrupt you regularly, popping up like jack-in-the-boxes every time you casually glance around the room.
Have you tasted Sushi? I haven't!
Have you tasted Sushi? I haven’t!
  • If you happen to visit Japan, do make it a point to spend a night at a traditional Japanese inn. The gentle scent of tatami (rice-straw mats), the understated elegance of the interiors, the meticulous service, the outdoor hot spring baths, the multi-course meal of local seasonal produce, the calming silence. It’s a mindblowing experience. At least according to National Geographic
  • The people in Japan are nice, polite, formal, intelligent. The students out there prefer group activities. And and and, they are punctual. I can almost imagine being a Japanese citizen.

calligraphy-1176334_960_720

So, have you visited Japan? Have I done justice in describing the Japanese? Do let me know in the comments 🙂

Arigatou gozaimasu for sparing some time and reading this post. In fact, I’d like to thank all of you who have read all the posts I have done till now for this challenge. You who comment on each and every post and share them all, you keep me motivated ❤

~Word-scavenger

Information sourced at Wiktionary

Japan Information – GoAbroad.com , Lonely Planet . Pics from Pixabay

Advertisements

37 Comments Add yours

  1. Parul Thakur says:

    Japan is beautiful and on those masks, I saw that in Hong Kong too. People consider it very bad if you have a cold and you are not wearing one. Great word.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      That’s something that struck me as very nice when I was researching for the post.
      Thank you for stopping by, Parul 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I bet you are a Nipponophile. Japanese seem to be the cultured lot when it comes to dining life style and civility.

    https://vishalbheeroo.wordpress.com/2016/04/13/l-for-lo-jabra-fan/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      I became a Nipponophile while I was researching for the post 😀

      Like

  3. Dahlia says:

    True, we can learn a lot from the Japanese – but for starters learnt a new word today 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      True! But do read more about their culture. It truly is fabulous 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dahlia says:

        Will do 🙂

        Like

  4. Wowow
    I liked Japan earlier
    But now I am loving the place and people .

    They are so much sincere and well mannered .
    I wanna eat sushi in Japan 😅😅.

    The bacteria , to wasting food, to many other things 😂😂feeling sick of Being an Indian .

    @dixita011 from
    Cafenined words

    Like

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      You will become a Nipponophile gradually, when you eat sushi 😀
      I know right. We truly need to learn something from the Japanese 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Never been there but I hav a great deal of respect for the Japanese and honestly believe India needs to take a leaf out of them.
    They had a violent past which eventually ended with the Hiroshima Nagasaki disaster.
    Since then, the people have actively chosen to embrace peace and serenity rather than continue down their old path. True role models in that matter, especially in a world today where everyone is fighting to establish their old roots.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      That’s goo, right? They decided to convert the bad past into something that the world admires. How many of us can do that 🙂
      Glad you liked the post, doc 🙂

      Like

  6. kalaravi16 says:

    That was totally a Nipponopromophilia! I loved all the snippets you gathered about this land on the east. Discipline and respect for one’s roots is something the world needs to learn from the Japanese. Would love to visit this place sometime, have heard so much about it, only hitch I guess I’ll face is food…I am a total veggie! No sushi for me 😦
    @KalaRavi16 from
    Relax-N-Rave

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Nipponpromophilia 😂
      I’ve heard that there is a buffet in Japan which has 400 year old recipes, and they have a veggie section too! Surely that would be better than the sushi 😉
      I’m glad that you liked the points, Kala 🙂

      Like

  7. Kalpanaa says:

    I’m already a nipponophile – just from reading your post and knowing that it’s true. I haven’t been to Japan – yet. Glad to be here. Lovely blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Thank you Kalpana 😊

      Like

  8. richajindal says:

    I respect all cultures but after reading your post i’ve developed great respect for Japan n the people . Simply loved it.
    @2richajindal
    http://richajindal.com/no-sugar-impossible/
    http://jindalpackers.com/blog/customer-complaints/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Thank you Richa 🙂

      Like

  9. Sulekha says:

    I have a list of places to visit and Japan is in the top three 🙂 I would love to experience the culture and cuisine of Japan along with walking in the Zen gardens I have seen pictures of 🙂 You have given me a lot of information for my future trip, thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      I’m glad this post helped you, Sulekha! 😊
      Do make that trip to Japan, and of course, blog post and pics please 🙈😁

      Like

  10. I’m not a fan of raw meat and fish so no sushi for me although I’ve tried the veggie version. I so agree with finishing what’s on your plate or in this case, in your bowl.
    I’ve learnt another new word thanks to your super cool theme. 🙂 Arigato, Mithila.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      I may want to try it once, and then decide if I like it or no.
      Wow! The best comment you know. You paid attention to the new word I was trying to teach too! #Honoured 🙂

      Like

  11. inquisitivegeet says:

    Japanese culture is very interesting and reading about them above make me want to go to Japan already! They are very particular about the food habits and manners. I learned a bit of Japanese in my college days, do not remember it much!

    Good job done Mithila San 🙂

    Cheers
    Geets

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      That makes the two of us! 😀
      I would rather learn to write Japanese, so I could write unreadable messages 😛

      Thank you so much, Geets! 🙂

      Like

  12. My Era says:

    After reading your post I’m a Nipponophile 🙂
    That’s a great list and a smart choice of an offbeat word for letter ‘N’

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      That was the objective of sharing this post. I’m glad that it was successful 🙂

      Like

  13. Vinay Leo R. says:

    I have not visited Japan, but one of my good friends stays there 🙂 so I had been a Nipponophile after interacting with her. This just added to the reasons. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      That’s great! Did you share this post with her? 😀

      Like

  14. CM says:

    Okay .. another co incidence . the other day I was reading about how efficient the Japanese are that if their lifeline – metros that is , is late by 5 mins , they get a receipt confirming the delay that one can go and submit at one’s place of work or college
    If your well curated list is any indicator – Japan sounds like the perfect place for people like me .. bring on the hush tones and dollops of formality and yes — wasting food – God I am obsessive about that too !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Woah! Imagine that in India, where we all use the same excuse when we are running late to office. We’ll have to start thinking of new excuses 😛
      If I can make the comparison, Japan seems like the Himalayas of the modern times. You know, you’re still connected to the world, but you still have that silent and quiet atmosphere around you 🙂

      Like

  15. What a wonderful collection of lovely things about Japan and its culture.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Does this have something to do with Nippon batteries as well? 😛

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Nippon batteries are made in Japan 😛

      Like

  17. Shilpa Garg says:

    Wow! There’s a word like that! Is there a word for loving India and its culture 😀
    This made for an interesting read 🙂

    Like

  18. 2 AM Writer says:

    The japanese literature bug bit me with Haruki Murakami and I’ve been trying to egt my hands on at least a few good books each month. I finished reading higashino recently and i can assure you, it’s very easy to be impressed by Japan and become a nipponophile. Such a nice country, culturally.

    Like

And now, it's time for you to share your thoughts! Go on, your thoughts and feedback are valuable to me.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s