H for Hors d’oeuvre #AtoZChallenge

Hors d’oeuvre

Meaning: a small bit of appetizing food, as spicy meat, fish, cheese, or preparation of chopped or creamed foods, often served on crackers or small pieces of toast, for eating at cocktail parties or other gatherings where drinks are served with no other food.

Etymology: French

Pronunciation: awr durv

Usage in a sentence: “Cheesy hors d’oeuvres with wine are a perfect combination.”

hors d oeuvre

 

I first saw this word when I was prepping for the National Spell Bee in 2013. I didn’t quite know how to pronounce it, and by the look of the word, I was pretty sure it had been derived from French (I learnt later that it is a French word too.)

The French have this way of making extremely complicated spellings of words which have just two or three syllables. This word has only two syllables. And look at the complication of the spelling. Spell Check left me to my own devices as I did the research for this post.

Some more French foods are bouillabaisse (traditional Provençal fish stew), croquembouche (French dessert consisting of choux pastry balls piled into a cone and bound with threads of caramel), macarons (French sweet meringue-based confection made with egg white, icing sugar, granulated sugar, almond powder or ground almond, and food colouring), mille-feuilles (vanilla slice, custard slice, also known as the Napoleon) , ratatouille (a vegetable stew with olive oil, aubergine, courgette, bell pepper, tomato, onion and garlic), foie gras (all I know about it is that the Dowager Princess in Princess Diaries loved eating this), Pan-bagnat (sandwich with whole wheat bread, salade, hard-boiled eggs, tomatoes, tuna or anchovies and olive oil), Gratin dauphinois (a traditional regional French dish based on potatoes and crème fraîche)

Uff. Tired of copy pasting all this from Wikipedia. Hope I got you enticed enough to run to Google Images, and dive into your screen? Or have you already sampled and devoured these dishes from the French cuisine? Do share your experience in the comments section! 🙂

~Word-scavenger

Information sourced at Dictionary.com

Advertisements

34 Comments Add yours

  1. Vinay Leo R. says:

    A word I’ve heard on Masterchef but couldn’t have spelled to save my life. 🙂 😀 I’ve sampled some of them, yes. 😀

    PS: Did you win the spelling bee? 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Masterchef is a great place to see how the name of the dish is spelled, hear it pronounced correctly by the pros, and then watch them make it too 😀

      P.S.: No I didn’t. Reached the top 16 in that season, though 🙂

      Like

  2. 2 AM Writer says:

    The only way i could remember the pronounciation for the word was by say ‘orderve’

    Liked by 1 person

    1. 2 AM Writer says:

      Saying** auto correct is messing it up, hate commenting from mobile

      Like

      1. fabulus1710 says:

        That’s a cool way to remember it. I can usually remember spellings like as if I’m looking at the word written on a paper, in my mind. Some call it photographic memory, I just call it inbuilt fabulusness 😛

        Commenting from the mobile is really crazy. Sometimes, the comment just runs away into the unknown! 😀

        Thank you for stopping by! 🙂

        Like

  3. Rian Durant says:

    I like macarones but I don’t think I’ve tried any of the others. My taste is for a cuisine a lot lighter than the French. 😁

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      I’ve just tasted macarons. Nothing else. I do want to try out ratatouille though. The movie by the same name got me interested in French cuisine 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. My Era says:

    All the French delicacies mentioned above are as delicate on the palate as they require tongue twisting to pronounce them correctly.
    Though they’re all as technique sensitive in cooking as are they difficult to spell.
    Have eaten them all, cooked a few but I still can’t spell them right.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      No wonders only the French people can pronounce the names of their dishes correctly.
      Why do French people have all the time in the world to cook such dishes, and then concoct some weird names for them too? 😛
      You’ve tasted them all? :O And cooked a few? *salutes you* 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  5. You are queen of words;)

    Interesting words 😃😃
    For me difficult to pronounce yet :p

    Appreciate your words (Logophile)

    @dixita011 from
    Cafenined words

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Just try saying ‘or’. Then try saying ‘darr’ in Hindi, and end it with a ‘v’, like in the word ‘marvel’. Got it?

      Yes logophile! I’m glad you’re liking my posts. ❤
      Hugs! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Parul Thakur says:

    Finally one word that I have heard of. Not used but heard. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      The “I for” post is also on a word that i’m a 110% sure you’ve heard of! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Kala Ravi says:

    I’ve heard this one! All these words are making me so hungry! Actually I’ve heard some disgusting things about Foie Gras! Rest I’ve heard thanks to MasterChef Aussie!
    @KalaRavi16 from
    Relax-N-Rave

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      That was the whole point of putting this word. To distract all you bloggers from commenting and sharing post on the weekend, and forcing you’ll to take some time off for yourselves 😉
      Yup, Foie Gras is just another way to treat animals like sacrificial lambs for us human gods! 😦

      Like

  8. Natalie says:

    I’ve only tired croquembouche and macarons, which were delicious! I’ve always wanted to try ratatouille.

    @LunaNoctis from There She Goes

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      I’ve seen the Masterchef episode in which there was a task to make Croquembouche. It was on the Indian Masterchef, if I’m not mistaken.
      Me too! The movie with the same name showed Anton Ego critiquing it so beautifully 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Natalie says:

        That film is precisely why I want to try it 😀

        Like

  9. Wow reading your post I kinda feel hungry. By the way, I hate french words for their spellings!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Imagine me doing research for the post, and feeling hungry looking at all the images. Imagine what would happen if I had to add the pics also? 😛

      Like

  10. Beat About The Book says:

    Rather than google images I am stuck at UTube trying to figure out how to pronounce them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      I should have added that to the post, no? *hides face*

      Like

  11. Shilpa Garg says:

    These French words look dangerous and their phonetic spelling is so different from actual spelling!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Exactly! Imagine trying to order these dishes in a French restaurant. They’d have thrown us out immediately 😛

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Debbie D. says:

    I was born in Europe and am familiar with Hors D’ouevres and the other French foods you mentioned. They go well with Champagne, a delightful French elixir. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Wow! Which is your favourite one?
      Champagne, hmm. I’ve only read about how people feel after drinking champagne, courtesy The Fault In Our Stars. Yet to try it 🙂
      Thank you for stopping by, Debbie!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Debbie D. says:

        Of the ones you’ve listed, bouillabaisse would be my favourite. I love seafood! Add a glass of dry white wine to that = perfect meal. 🙂 Perhaps your stars were overindulging in the champagne? Moderation is the key.

        Like

        1. fabulus1710 says:

          Will add that to my ‘to-be-sampled’ list! 🙂

          Maybe they were. They described the experience like little stars and what not. 😀

          Like

  13. the little princess says:

    this is a nice word, have heard this before…turns around beautifully on the tongue!
    Shubhangi @ The Little Princess

    Liked by 1 person

    1. fabulus1710 says:

      Doesn’t it?
      But is a nightmare for any spell bee participant 😛

      Like

  14. inquisitivegeet says:

    French words are really difficult to get. The way they are spelled and the way they are pronounced, is completely opposite!
    Interesting take on H Mithila 🙂

    Cheers
    Geets

    Like

  15. The pronunciation is quite something though 😛

    I love food and the better the Hors d’oeuvre the better the meal for me 🙂

    Like

  16. Mithila, if you haven’t yet read it, you will love Bill Bryson’s The Mother Tongue: English and how it got that way. He explains why food is described in French but the ingredients that go into it are in English. 🙂 Apparently, it goes back to when the growers/producers etc were peasants and the consumers were the royalty which descended from French lineage and where French was the language of the courtiers.
    Your fabulous post reminded me of it. 🙂

    Like

If you're here, you might as well make your mark. This is true for your place in the world, and your presence on my blog. Go on, comment away!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s